Tag Archives: discussion and facilitation

How online education benefits introverted students (essay)

Joe told me that after his high school graduation, he’d put off college because of his fears of the classroom environment. He’d decided to enroll in this, one class at his local community college, because he had the option to take his courses online. Joe loved the online environment, and rather than feeling like it was his second-best option or that he was a second-best learner, he was empowered and eager. I imagined him pursuing his degree while maturity had a chance to do its job, gaining confidence in his ideas in written form first so that he could begin to take more extroverted baby steps in the future.

Source: www.insidehighered.com

An important essay by Karen Costa on the benefits of online learning for introverted students. 

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Best Practices for Online Discussion: 16 Quality, Timing, and Value Added Response Tips

Expertly facilitated online discussion is the driving force for community in e-learning classes. Creating norms for discussion quality and timing improve the dialog. This also helps the facilitator step back as students learn to deepen their online dialog.

Source: elearning-certificate.blogspot.com

Special thanks to Kathy Hayden of Cal-State San Marcos for the many of the ideas behind ‘Value Added‘ response techniques.  It’s always useful to mix up the types of responses you offer to your students (and peers)  in an online discussion. 

Maryellen Weimer, PhD: Classroom Discussions: How to Apply the Right Amount of Structure

How does one prepare for these unstructured structured discussions? Maybe it starts with having a general sense of discussion possibilities, identifying some of the priorities, but being open to unexpected outcomes. What actions does this general orientation entail? Most of us launch discussions with questions, but we also head into the discussion having good answers to those questions.

Source: www.facultyfocus.com

Dr. Weimer always provides insight wrapped around practical suggestions. This piece on the structure of discussions (both online and face to face) is spot on. 

What To Do When Online Discussion Dies – eLearning Industry

Ever had a discussion forum or social chat fall silent? Students that are deeply engaged in forums and chat have a more enjoyable experience and are more likely to complete their course successfully. Here’s how you can reignite engagement when online discussion dies.

Source: elearningindustry.com

Tips for students and for instructors on what to do when a discussion runs out of gas. 

Effective Discussion Prompts for Online Discussion Boards

Published on Jun 7, 2015
The video explains why it is important to ask right, open-ended questions. It will give you overview for ineffective and effective question for online discussion boards, and some ideas of alternatives to the question-and-answer format.

Source: www.youtube.com

Learning to facilitate online discussion requires practice and a first foundation in the best practices described in this video. 

Common Sense Media Review: Flipgrid

Flipgrid is a website that allows teachers to create grids of short discussion-style questions that students respond to through recorded videos. You can create up to four grids with a Flipgrid account. Grids can be classes, sections, groups of students, research groups, faculty groups, or any collection of users interested in a common strand of questions. Each grid can hold an unlimited number of questions, and each question can hold an unlimited number of responses. Questions are short, text-based prompts (think Twitter) that can include basic formatting (such as bold, italic) and links to websites or documents.

Source: www.commonsense.org

I’ve always been an early adopter of teaching technologies.  This one is tempting indeed. This review looks at Flipgrid for use in Grades 6-12.    I can see it working at a graduate level. 

 

To risk a cliche: “The proof is in the pudding…”   You won’t really know unless you try it.